Author: Rich Novicky

Job Shop Helps Improve Welding of Rupture Disks

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Electron Beam Engineering, Inc. (EBE) has helped BS&B Safety Systems make significant improvements in the welding of its rupture disks, EBE reported recently. Electron Beam Engineering is a southern California-based provider of electron beam and laser beam welding services that specializes in working with complex components. Rupture disks, also known as pressure safety disks, are sensitive relief devices designed to instantaneously rupture at a predetermined pressure and temperature as a means of providing protection for personnel, electronics, and equipment. Rupture disks are commonly used in automotive, petrochemical, aerospace, medical, pharmaceutical, food processing, and oil field applications. “Before we got involved, BS&B was conventionally welding, clamping, or gluing its rupture disks,” said Richard Trillwood, CEO of Electron Beam Engineering, in a company release. “Because of our precision electron beam welding and the low amount of heat generated, our process produces less distortion and minimal effect on the burst disk material, resulting in a much better product, and is ideal for special materials and designs. The outcome is a manufacturing procedure that is more predictable, resulting in a higher yield of disks all having the same burst pressure.” One frequent use of burst disks is for fire suppression products, such as sprinklers. A fire suppression gas, which has been specifically developed as a clean agent to not be harmful to people or the atmosphere, is instantly released through...

Read More

Pressure Switch Reported to Thrive in Tough Environments

RIVERDALE, N.J.—Sigma-Netics Inc. has added a 2-pin Deutsch connector option to its 784 Series of ruggedized pressure switches. The 2-pin option allows the 784 Series to serve a wider range of applications, including those with limited installation space, the company reported in a recent release. Originally available with just a 3-pin Deutsch, the 784 pressure switch is compliant with IP67 standards for maximum environmental protection. The model, a piston-based design with an 8-to-6,000 psig range, is reported to thrive in tough environments, where it may be exposed to oil, fuel, water, dust, vibration, or shock. The pressure switch features a snap-action electrical switch tested to one million cycles, gold contact switches for dry circuit applications, high overpressure capabilities, and custom configurations. Capable of functioning in a temperature range of -40ºF to 250ºF, it includes a 303 stainless steel, hydraulic module housing. Sigma-Netics (sigmanetics.com), based in Riverdale, New Jersey, designs and manufactures sensing elements for demanding industrial, military, and aerospace applications. In addition to pressure switches, the company manufactures metal bellows and metal bellows...

Read More

VOC-free Fiberglass Material Reported to Boost Production at Lower Cost

KANSAS CITY, Kans., and HAYDEN, Idaho—Manufacturers have long used fiberglass when a strong, lightweight, formable material with some flexibility is required. For these reasons, it is a key building material among manufacturers of boats, trailers, automobiles, RVs, furniture, Jacuzzis and bathtubs, and water park slides. Yet fiberglass emits hazardous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during manufacturing due to its resins. Resins serve as a binding agent to fiberglass strands and typically contain styrene, a toxic air pollutant. As such, fiberglass is increasingly regulated by federal, state, and local agencies, particularly in California. “We have manufactured composite fiberglass trailers with traditional polyester resins, vacuum infusion, even epoxies, but after California’s AQMD levied a $26,000 fine for VOC emissions, we moved out of state,” said Vince Austin, owner of NestEgg Trailers, a manufacturer of lightweight tow-behind trailers now based in Hayden, Idaho. Because of the limitations of traditional fiberglass, manufacturers are being forced to look beyond the usual manufacturing techniques. That’s where a breakthrough in the manufacturing process of fiberglass has led many proactive manufacturers to find a new, VOC-free fiberglass alternative using a specially designed polyurea that increases production at a lower cost. Such a resin substitute not only dries within 30 seconds, but also can be used with a chopper-mounted spray gun to make parts and even molds or rapid prototypes in minutes. Because choppers cut the fiberglass strand to...

Read More

Process Reported to Yield Metallic Finishes, Unlimited Tint Options for Vehicles

TROY, Mich. — SRG Global™ has introduced its G-Coat™ tint-over-chrome process to help automakers better facilitate pushing the boundaries of design, styling, and functionality. SRG Global (srgglobal.com) is a prominent global manufacturer of chrome-plated and painted plastic parts for the automotive, commercial truck, and household appliance industries. The company manufactures in North America, Western and Central Europe, and Asia. “One of our company’s core innovation pillars is the importance of design. We see automobiles as an extension of consumer preferences, personality, and lifestyle, and our products are often considered to be the ‘jewelry’ of the car,” said Dave Prater, president and CEO of SRG Global, in a company release. “This proprietary process allows our automaker customers more flexibility and options when adding differentiation to their vehicles.” The G-Coat process is reported to deliver distinct metallic surface finishes for exterior and interior applications and to regularly improve paint adhesion to any chrome-plated plastic part. It is said to offer nearly unlimited custom color options, including a high optical density, deep black finish not achievable by other technologies, SRG Global reported in its press release. The process is also said to provide enhanced corrosion protection and fingerprint resistance compared to other processes and to meet multiple automotive OEM performance standards for basecoat and clear coat paint systems. “The G-Coat process was refined over many months with a significant amount of learning...

Read More

Stratasys Reveals Large-Part 3D Printing Demonstrator

MINNEAPOLIS & REHOVOT, Israel—The 3D printing and additive manufacturing company Stratasys is working with Ford and Boeing on new technology to 3D print large aerospace and automotive parts. Demonstrations of the technology, including the Stratasys Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator, were to be previewed at IMTS 2016 as part of the company’s Shaping What’s Next™ vision for manufacturing. In a company release, Stratasys said that its Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator builds on the company’s industrial FDM® 3D printing expertise to respond to the needs of customers’ most challenging applications. The 3D demonstrator is said to address manufacturers’ needs to rapidly produce strong parts ranging in size from an automobile armrest to an entire aircraft interior panel. The Stratasys Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator is designed to address the requirements of aerospace, automotive, and other industries for large lightweight, thermoplastic parts with repeatable mechanical properties. The Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator offers what the company calls a revolutionary approach to FDM extrusion that increases throughput and repeatability. The system is said to turn the traditional 3D printer concept on its side to realize an “infinite-build” approach that prints on a vertical plane for practically unlimited part size in the build direction. Aerospace giant Boeing played an influential role in defining the requirements and specifications for the demonstrator. Boeing is currently using an Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator to explore the production of low volume, lightweight parts. Ford Motor Company...

Read More

What’s Your Strategy for Meeting IMDS Requirements?

IMDS, a universal data reporting requirement for suppliers in the automotive supply chain, isn’t going away anytime soon. To stay on the right side of compliance, companies need to plan ahead. By Derrik Snider “They won’t let us ship auto parts without IMDS!” exclaimed Steve, production manager at FabFitCo. “Why not?” asked Brian, the company’s general manager. “It’s due on Friday.” “To ship, we need an IMDS number on the PPAP, and to get one, we have to provide detailed data on every piece of material in the part, including our supplier’s materials,” explained Steve. “We’ve done capability studies, CpKs, GRRs before. What’s different about this?” Brian asked. “It’s unique to the auto business,” Steve replied. “For every part that goes into a car, we have to break down the part assembly, specify every material substance at every level, and enter the data in the online IMDS system. Until we do that, they won’t let us ship it. ” “Can’t we just tell our customer what’s in it—send them the material certs?” Brian asked. “I tried that, but they have to have the information in the online system. I can’t just send them a paper copy,” Steve replied. “We have material safety data sheets in that binder. Can we use those?” Brian asked. “No,” Steve replied. “The MSD sheets only list hazardous chemicals; they don’t add up to 100...

Read More

A Powerful 1-2-3 Punch for American Manufacturing

Reshoring is real, but it’s only one part of a robust expansion currently taking place in U.S. manufacturing. By Mark Shortt Paul Elio wants to keep the American Dream alive. The 52-year-old mechanical engineer started his own car company, Elio Motors, in 2009, after 13 years as head of an engineering consultancy, ESG Engineering, and a four-year stint as a design engineer at Johnson Controls. If things go according to plan, the first Elio automobile—an 84-mpg three-wheeler with a base price of $7300—will roll off the assembly line at GM’s former Hummer H3 plant in Shreveport, Louisiana, next year, carrying with it Paul Elio’s commitment to creating American jobs and his faith in American automotive ingenuity. “From day one, I wanted to build a 100 percent American car,” Elio told D2P in a phone interview. “I can show, with data, that we can build a low price, high quality vehicle in this country with about 90 percent North American content. We have to make things in this country and we have to export from this country. I think it’s critically important to our long term survival as a nation.” Elio estimates that manufacturing the car—known as the Elio—in the United States will create more than 1500 jobs at its Shreveport facility and approximately 1500 jobs throughout the supply base, most of which is located within easy reach of Elio’s...

Read More

Technology Merges with Automotive in New Era of Efficient, User-Centric Mobility

Automakers are increasingly adopting mixed-materials strategies to reduce vehicle weight. Meanwhile, the car of the future is emerging as a smart, connected, electrified vehicle that redefines how vehicles are created—by employing a user-driven, multi-disciplinary approach to product design and manufacturing. By Mark Shortt It’s not unusual today to hear an automotive executive refer to their company as a technology company or mobility company. Pressures to meet unyielding fuel efficiency requirements and to deliver uncompromising customer experiences are driving the development of a host of advanced technologies for automakers. And as they embrace them with open arms, companies from the likes of Ford and General Motors to Tesla and Faraday Future are redefining what it means to be an automotive manufacturer today. A New Model for Product Design and Development Tesla CEO Elon Musk wasn’t kidding last year when, as reported by Jerry Hirsch in a March 19, 2015 piece in the Los Angeles Times, he referred to the Model S electric sedan as “a sophisticated computer on wheels” for its ability to receive software updates for safety features like automatic braking and a partial autopilot system. “Tesla is a software company as much it is a hardware company,” Musk was quoted as saying. “A huge part of what Tesla is, is a Silicon Valley software company. We view this the same as updating your phone or your laptop.” Faraday...

Read More

Quality Suppliers

This Month’s Shop Spotlight

Featured Video

Featured Video